5 Movies to Watch Before Living in Student Housing

These movies paint an entertaining, if not always realistic, picture of living on campus. Moving into student housing can be an exciting event in anyone’s life. It’s no wonder that so many movies have portrayed the experience. Check out these five movie dorms before you make the move yourself.

Pitch Perfect (2012)

Filmed on Louisiana State University’s campus, Pitch Perfect puts Beca in the Barden Bellas right before their big acapella competition. Beca lives on-campus in one of the university dorms, for which real Pentagon was the stand-in. If you think Beca’s dorm is standard, you’re in for a surprise. Since the average student is underaged, many campuses restrict or forbid alcohol consumption. You can still have a swell time by getting involved with student groups that sing and enjoy other activities.

Animal House (1978)

Considered in most respects to be the definitive college movie, Animal House tells about Delta Tau Chi fraternity’s decision to stick it to the Dean and put on a huge homecoming parade that no one will ever forget. Animal House captures the fun spirit and fast friendships roommates often form over the course of living together.

Monsters University (2013)

This movie, a follow-up to Pixar’s Monsters, Inc., follows scarers Mike and Sully back when they attended Monsters University. Mike and Sully are randomly paired in the freshman dormitories in the center of campus, conveniently located next to the dining hall. They bunk the beds in their room. Partying is again part of the atmosphere, and things get hairy during the Scare Games. For student housing, different schools have different policies on rooming with friends or being paired with a random roommate. Like Monsters University, random roommates can sometimes lead to lasting friendships.

Legally Blonde (2001)

Elle Woods makes it look easy to get into Harvard Law and into a dorm. She brings Bruiser, her pet chihuahua, to live with her in room at Harvard, and quickly bedazzles the room with pink and glitter. On-campus student housing doesn’t usually allow furry friends-you’ll have to settle for a goldfish or a turtle. But you might be able to get away with the pink and furry decorations.

Accepted (2006)

Good-natured slacker Bartleby and all of his friends create their own school-South Hampton Institute of Technology-to trick their parents and friends into thinking they’re enrolled. The cool thing about the South Hampton’s rooming situation is that it is totally communal. While this isn’t a style too many colleges use today, it does make for some fun parties. Most schools have moved to apartment style housing, which allows roommates a little bit more privacy.

Although these are all fun looks into dorm life, they’re not always true-to-life. Today’s college freshman doesn’t have to live on-campus or in a frat house as crazy as Delta Chi Tau. There are often a variety of student housing options located near college campuses, both on-campus and off. Choose the student housing option that works best for your budget and lifestyle.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9262567

The Best Used Car Dealers From the Movies

These movies paint an entertaining, if not always realistic, picture of living on campus. Moving into student housing can be an exciting event in anyone’s life. It’s no wonder that so many movies have portrayed the experience. Check out these five movie dorms before you make the move yourself.

Pitch Perfect (2012)

Filmed on Louisiana State University’s campus, Pitch Perfect puts Beca in the Barden Bellas right before their big acapella competition. Beca lives on-campus in one of the university dorms, for which real Pentagon was the stand-in. If you think Beca’s dorm is standard, you’re in for a surprise. Since the average student is underaged, many campuses restrict or forbid alcohol consumption. You can still have a swell time by getting involved with student groups that sing and enjoy other activities.

Animal House (1978)

Considered in most respects to be the definitive college movie, Animal House tells about Delta Tau Chi fraternity’s decision to stick it to the Dean and put on a huge homecoming parade that no one will ever forget. Animal House captures the fun spirit and fast friendships roommates often form over the course of living together.

Monsters University (2013)

This movie, a follow-up to Pixar’s Monsters, Inc., follows scarers Mike and Sully back when they attended Monsters University. Mike and Sully are randomly paired in the freshman dormitories in the center of campus, conveniently located next to the dining hall. They bunk the beds in their room. Partying is again part of the atmosphere, and things get hairy during the Scare Games. For student housing, different schools have different policies on rooming with friends or being paired with a random roommate. Like Monsters University, random roommates can sometimes lead to lasting friendships.

Legally Blonde (2001)

Elle Woods makes it look easy to get into Harvard Law and into a dorm. She brings Bruiser, her pet chihuahua, to live with her in room at Harvard, and quickly bedazzles the room with pink and glitter. On-campus student housing doesn’t usually allow furry friends-you’ll have to settle for a goldfish or a turtle. But you might be able to get away with the pink and furry decorations.

Accepted (2006)

Good-natured slacker Bartleby and all of his friends create their own school-South Hampton Institute of Technology-to trick their parents and friends into thinking they’re enrolled. The cool thing about the South Hampton’s rooming situation is that it is totally communal. While this isn’t a style too many colleges use today, it does make for some fun parties. Most schools have moved to apartment style housing, which allows roommates a little bit more privacy.

Although these are all fun looks into dorm life, they’re not always true-to-life. Today’s college freshman doesn’t have to live on-campus or in a frat house as crazy as Delta Chi Tau. There are often a variety of student housing options located near college campuses, both on-campus and off. Choose the student housing option that works best for your budget and lifestyle.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9262567

The Art Of Listening And Being Present

“You have to listen better,” your acting teacher says. So you really look at the other person, laser focus on them and say to yourself, “Listen… listen… listen… “

Then you see the playback and you look like a psychotic deer caught in alien headlights. You’re straining and bug-eyed and robotic. Why does the work look so inauthentic? The only thing you were focused on was listening better!

But not really. The only thing you were listening to was your own voice repeating that word over and over in your head until it lost all meaning. When you’re doing that you can’t possibly be listening to the other person.

This word “listening” is thrown around a lot. It’s often accompanied by “being present” and “living in the moment.” But do you really know how to listen and be present?

Sure you do; you do it every day when you’re not acting. In fact, you do it unconsciously in just about every moment in your life. But when you’re acting, you’re so self-conscious and focused on impressing your audience that this innate ability suddenly feels as foreign as eating with your toes.

So let’s get you out of your head and into the moment. First, a quick lesson in…

Human Beings and the Art of Communication

#1: What does “listening” really mean?

When you are truly listening, you care. A lot. You care enough about the other person to pay attention to what they are doing and saying.

So what makes you care? You need something from them. It could be as simple as a nod in agreement or as grand as the nuclear warhead code. Simply put, you listen to see if you’re getting what you want.

#2: What does it really mean to “be in the moment?”

You listen to see if you’re getting what you want, right? So…

What happens when you get what you want? You are changed.

What happens if you don’t get what you want? You are changed.

What happens if you’re not sure if you got what you wanted? You are changed.

That’s what being in the moment is all about, folks: being affected by the other person. (AKA “reacting” – sound familiar?) You cannot be changed unless you care. When you care, you automatically listen and then organically, unconsciously react.

Congrats, you passed! Let’s move onto…

Actors and the Art of Communication

Based on what we know about real human behavior, what must the actor do to authentically listen and be in the moment?

#1: You must be able to answer this question: What do you (the character) want?

For instance: your mother just read your first manuscript and you’re waiting for her reaction to it. So you’re really looking for her approval. (Don’t deny it; we all need mommy’s approval.)

#2: You must know why you need what you need.

Answering the question and knowing why isn’t enough, of course. You must also create the imagined relationships in such a way that you truly feel them.

So why do you need mom’s approval of your manuscript? Because she’s never approved of any of your creative projects; she just thought they were “phases” and not real jobs. But this book, the one you’ve been writing for over two years, the one she just finished reading, this is your baby. And whether you like it or not, you really would like to hear “Good job, honey.” Or at least a smile; just a smile would be enough.

That is a real relationship. That is what it means to truly need something from someone else, which allows you to organically listen. Then when she hugs you, you’ll feel it and respond authentically without even trying. Or if all she’s says is, “I finished it. What do you want for dinner?” you’ll feel that and respond authentically.

A Quick Math Lesson

Deeply caring = feeling what you need/want = truthful listening = authentically being in the moment

Final Exam

It’s not enough to tell yourself to “listen better.” It’s not enough to just look at the other person. You must know why you’re listening. The relationship must feel very real to you and whatever you need from the other person must feel real as well.

So if you’re having trouble truly listening – that is, truly being affected by the other person – then revisit your relationship and your need. Make them real. Make them of the utmost importance. And then you’ll listen without even trying.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9290688

Why Actors Should Stop Planning

how-to-start-an-acting-careerAllison leaves an audition and pumps her fist. “I nailed it! I did everything I wanted to; laughed at the exact right moment, gave them that sarcastic look, put my hand on my hip… that was awesome!”

Sheena leaves an audition for the same role a little dazed. “I have no idea what just happened.”

Who books it? Probably Sheena. Why? She was fully present. So present and connected to the other person that she has no idea what she herself did. There was no room for self-reflection in the moment because she was so focused on the other person.

Think about it: in your real life, have you ever left a conversation knowing exactly what you did during every single moment? You might remember laughing, and you’ll definitely walk away from that conversation charged with feeling, but you can’t recall it like a video tape. You don’t know exactly when you put your hand on your hip or what your facial expressions were at any given moment. (Unless you have Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory. Yes, it’s a thing. Look it up.)

When you speak with another human being in your every day life – be it your mom, your crush or the Starbucks barista – you’re completely focused on them. You want something from them, don’t you? Whether it’s your mom’s approval, your crush’s crush back or even that the barista got your order right, you are paying attention to them because you need something. So you don’t remember anything about your behavior afterwards because your behavior is unconscious.

And so it should be with auditioning and acting. Your behavior should be unconscious. Your relationship to the other person should be so strong with such a specific need that the only thing you’re focused on is whether you’re getting what you want. If you’re truly living moment-to-moment, authentic behavior will follow without you having to worry about it.

But many actors are scared to not know what they’re going to do in the room. So they plan their behavior.

Do you ever plan your behavior in your real life? I’m not talking about telling yourself to play it cool when you ask her out or confront your father. You might have those emotional goals, but you don’t control your physical behavior – behavior just happens.

So why do you plan your behavior? Because you want the job, of course.

Ironically, thinking about booking the job will very often lead to you not booking the job. Planning your behavior puts you in your head the whole time as you try to execute what you’ve planned. How exhausting! Wouldn’t you rather experience this person’s life in the moment? Wouldn’t you rather experience the deliciousness of talking to your crush, fighting with your mom or ordering that half-caf-triple-shot-mocha-latte? Doesn’t that sound more fun?

Auditioning should feel vulnerable. It should feel unknown, exciting, electric. Because living in the moment is all of those things. Living in the moment is the most truthful experience you can have when you’re acting. But doing so means you have to give up control, let the other person be more important than yourself and have no idea what’s going to happen.

John Burroughs says, “Leap and the net will appear.” So stop planning. Leap, care about the other person and trust that you are enough… and your “performance” will transform into organic, unconscious behavior. In other words, truthful moment-to-moment living.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9290682