5 Movies to Watch Before Living in Student Housing

These movies paint an entertaining, if not always realistic, picture of living on campus. Moving into student housing can be an exciting event in anyone’s life. It’s no wonder that so many movies have portrayed the experience. Check out these five movie dorms before you make the move yourself.

Pitch Perfect (2012)

Filmed on Louisiana State University’s campus, Pitch Perfect puts Beca in the Barden Bellas right before their big acapella competition. Beca lives on-campus in one of the university dorms, for which real Pentagon was the stand-in. If you think Beca’s dorm is standard, you’re in for a surprise. Since the average student is underaged, many campuses restrict or forbid alcohol consumption. You can still have a swell time by getting involved with student groups that sing and enjoy other activities.

Animal House (1978)

Considered in most respects to be the definitive college movie, Animal House tells about Delta Tau Chi fraternity’s decision to stick it to the Dean and put on a huge homecoming parade that no one will ever forget. Animal House captures the fun spirit and fast friendships roommates often form over the course of living together.

Monsters University (2013)

This movie, a follow-up to Pixar’s Monsters, Inc., follows scarers Mike and Sully back when they attended Monsters University. Mike and Sully are randomly paired in the freshman dormitories in the center of campus, conveniently located next to the dining hall. They bunk the beds in their room. Partying is again part of the atmosphere, and things get hairy during the Scare Games. For student housing, different schools have different policies on rooming with friends or being paired with a random roommate. Like Monsters University, random roommates can sometimes lead to lasting friendships.

Legally Blonde (2001)

Elle Woods makes it look easy to get into Harvard Law and into a dorm. She brings Bruiser, her pet chihuahua, to live with her in room at Harvard, and quickly bedazzles the room with pink and glitter. On-campus student housing doesn’t usually allow furry friends-you’ll have to settle for a goldfish or a turtle. But you might be able to get away with the pink and furry decorations.

Accepted (2006)

Good-natured slacker Bartleby and all of his friends create their own school-South Hampton Institute of Technology-to trick their parents and friends into thinking they’re enrolled. The cool thing about the South Hampton’s rooming situation is that it is totally communal. While this isn’t a style too many colleges use today, it does make for some fun parties. Most schools have moved to apartment style housing, which allows roommates a little bit more privacy.

Although these are all fun looks into dorm life, they’re not always true-to-life. Today’s college freshman doesn’t have to live on-campus or in a frat house as crazy as Delta Chi Tau. There are often a variety of student housing options located near college campuses, both on-campus and off. Choose the student housing option that works best for your budget and lifestyle.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9262567

The Best Used Car Dealers From the Movies

These movies paint an entertaining, if not always realistic, picture of living on campus. Moving into student housing can be an exciting event in anyone’s life. It’s no wonder that so many movies have portrayed the experience. Check out these five movie dorms before you make the move yourself.

Pitch Perfect (2012)

Filmed on Louisiana State University’s campus, Pitch Perfect puts Beca in the Barden Bellas right before their big acapella competition. Beca lives on-campus in one of the university dorms, for which real Pentagon was the stand-in. If you think Beca’s dorm is standard, you’re in for a surprise. Since the average student is underaged, many campuses restrict or forbid alcohol consumption. You can still have a swell time by getting involved with student groups that sing and enjoy other activities.

Animal House (1978)

Considered in most respects to be the definitive college movie, Animal House tells about Delta Tau Chi fraternity’s decision to stick it to the Dean and put on a huge homecoming parade that no one will ever forget. Animal House captures the fun spirit and fast friendships roommates often form over the course of living together.

Monsters University (2013)

This movie, a follow-up to Pixar’s Monsters, Inc., follows scarers Mike and Sully back when they attended Monsters University. Mike and Sully are randomly paired in the freshman dormitories in the center of campus, conveniently located next to the dining hall. They bunk the beds in their room. Partying is again part of the atmosphere, and things get hairy during the Scare Games. For student housing, different schools have different policies on rooming with friends or being paired with a random roommate. Like Monsters University, random roommates can sometimes lead to lasting friendships.

Legally Blonde (2001)

Elle Woods makes it look easy to get into Harvard Law and into a dorm. She brings Bruiser, her pet chihuahua, to live with her in room at Harvard, and quickly bedazzles the room with pink and glitter. On-campus student housing doesn’t usually allow furry friends-you’ll have to settle for a goldfish or a turtle. But you might be able to get away with the pink and furry decorations.

Accepted (2006)

Good-natured slacker Bartleby and all of his friends create their own school-South Hampton Institute of Technology-to trick their parents and friends into thinking they’re enrolled. The cool thing about the South Hampton’s rooming situation is that it is totally communal. While this isn’t a style too many colleges use today, it does make for some fun parties. Most schools have moved to apartment style housing, which allows roommates a little bit more privacy.

Although these are all fun looks into dorm life, they’re not always true-to-life. Today’s college freshman doesn’t have to live on-campus or in a frat house as crazy as Delta Chi Tau. There are often a variety of student housing options located near college campuses, both on-campus and off. Choose the student housing option that works best for your budget and lifestyle.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9262567

The Art Of Listening And Being Present

“You have to listen better,” your acting teacher says. So you really look at the other person, laser focus on them and say to yourself, “Listen… listen… listen… “

Then you see the playback and you look like a psychotic deer caught in alien headlights. You’re straining and bug-eyed and robotic. Why does the work look so inauthentic? The only thing you were focused on was listening better!

But not really. The only thing you were listening to was your own voice repeating that word over and over in your head until it lost all meaning. When you’re doing that you can’t possibly be listening to the other person.

This word “listening” is thrown around a lot. It’s often accompanied by “being present” and “living in the moment.” But do you really know how to listen and be present?

Sure you do; you do it every day when you’re not acting. In fact, you do it unconsciously in just about every moment in your life. But when you’re acting, you’re so self-conscious and focused on impressing your audience that this innate ability suddenly feels as foreign as eating with your toes.

So let’s get you out of your head and into the moment. First, a quick lesson in…

Human Beings and the Art of Communication

#1: What does “listening” really mean?

When you are truly listening, you care. A lot. You care enough about the other person to pay attention to what they are doing and saying.

So what makes you care? You need something from them. It could be as simple as a nod in agreement or as grand as the nuclear warhead code. Simply put, you listen to see if you’re getting what you want.

#2: What does it really mean to “be in the moment?”

You listen to see if you’re getting what you want, right? So…

What happens when you get what you want? You are changed.

What happens if you don’t get what you want? You are changed.

What happens if you’re not sure if you got what you wanted? You are changed.

That’s what being in the moment is all about, folks: being affected by the other person. (AKA “reacting” – sound familiar?) You cannot be changed unless you care. When you care, you automatically listen and then organically, unconsciously react.

Congrats, you passed! Let’s move onto…

Actors and the Art of Communication

Based on what we know about real human behavior, what must the actor do to authentically listen and be in the moment?

#1: You must be able to answer this question: What do you (the character) want?

For instance: your mother just read your first manuscript and you’re waiting for her reaction to it. So you’re really looking for her approval. (Don’t deny it; we all need mommy’s approval.)

#2: You must know why you need what you need.

Answering the question and knowing why isn’t enough, of course. You must also create the imagined relationships in such a way that you truly feel them.

So why do you need mom’s approval of your manuscript? Because she’s never approved of any of your creative projects; she just thought they were “phases” and not real jobs. But this book, the one you’ve been writing for over two years, the one she just finished reading, this is your baby. And whether you like it or not, you really would like to hear “Good job, honey.” Or at least a smile; just a smile would be enough.

That is a real relationship. That is what it means to truly need something from someone else, which allows you to organically listen. Then when she hugs you, you’ll feel it and respond authentically without even trying. Or if all she’s says is, “I finished it. What do you want for dinner?” you’ll feel that and respond authentically.

A Quick Math Lesson

Deeply caring = feeling what you need/want = truthful listening = authentically being in the moment

Final Exam

It’s not enough to tell yourself to “listen better.” It’s not enough to just look at the other person. You must know why you’re listening. The relationship must feel very real to you and whatever you need from the other person must feel real as well.

So if you’re having trouble truly listening – that is, truly being affected by the other person – then revisit your relationship and your need. Make them real. Make them of the utmost importance. And then you’ll listen without even trying.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9290688

Why Actors Should Stop Planning

how-to-start-an-acting-careerAllison leaves an audition and pumps her fist. “I nailed it! I did everything I wanted to; laughed at the exact right moment, gave them that sarcastic look, put my hand on my hip… that was awesome!”

Sheena leaves an audition for the same role a little dazed. “I have no idea what just happened.”

Who books it? Probably Sheena. Why? She was fully present. So present and connected to the other person that she has no idea what she herself did. There was no room for self-reflection in the moment because she was so focused on the other person.

Think about it: in your real life, have you ever left a conversation knowing exactly what you did during every single moment? You might remember laughing, and you’ll definitely walk away from that conversation charged with feeling, but you can’t recall it like a video tape. You don’t know exactly when you put your hand on your hip or what your facial expressions were at any given moment. (Unless you have Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory. Yes, it’s a thing. Look it up.)

When you speak with another human being in your every day life – be it your mom, your crush or the Starbucks barista – you’re completely focused on them. You want something from them, don’t you? Whether it’s your mom’s approval, your crush’s crush back or even that the barista got your order right, you are paying attention to them because you need something. So you don’t remember anything about your behavior afterwards because your behavior is unconscious.

And so it should be with auditioning and acting. Your behavior should be unconscious. Your relationship to the other person should be so strong with such a specific need that the only thing you’re focused on is whether you’re getting what you want. If you’re truly living moment-to-moment, authentic behavior will follow without you having to worry about it.

But many actors are scared to not know what they’re going to do in the room. So they plan their behavior.

Do you ever plan your behavior in your real life? I’m not talking about telling yourself to play it cool when you ask her out or confront your father. You might have those emotional goals, but you don’t control your physical behavior – behavior just happens.

So why do you plan your behavior? Because you want the job, of course.

Ironically, thinking about booking the job will very often lead to you not booking the job. Planning your behavior puts you in your head the whole time as you try to execute what you’ve planned. How exhausting! Wouldn’t you rather experience this person’s life in the moment? Wouldn’t you rather experience the deliciousness of talking to your crush, fighting with your mom or ordering that half-caf-triple-shot-mocha-latte? Doesn’t that sound more fun?

Auditioning should feel vulnerable. It should feel unknown, exciting, electric. Because living in the moment is all of those things. Living in the moment is the most truthful experience you can have when you’re acting. But doing so means you have to give up control, let the other person be more important than yourself and have no idea what’s going to happen.

John Burroughs says, “Leap and the net will appear.” So stop planning. Leap, care about the other person and trust that you are enough… and your “performance” will transform into organic, unconscious behavior. In other words, truthful moment-to-moment living.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9290682

Acting: How To Break Through An Emotional Block

You have an audition for the role of a drug addict or someone who is suicidal. Or maybe the character is struggling over the loss of a parent or child. Or they are trying to escape an abusive household or dealing with PTSD. Maybe they’re battling a war in Afghanistan or inside their own community. Or they’re going through a divorce or dying of cancer.

Emotionally deep roles can be intimidating and scary – so much so that some actors shut down. They hit a block; something in them refuses to “go there” in an effort to avoid uncomfortable feelings like fear, pain, sadness and grief. And yet, that’s our job. If you’re going to represent humanity, you must be willing to experience the whole spectrum.

So when you hit an emotional block, how do you get beyond it?

We must remember why we do what we do. As actors pursue their careers, chasing after resume-building credits and insurance-keeping checks, we often forget why we starting acting in the first place.

I started acting because it was fun. I discovered how freeing it can be to transform into someone else, speak their words and live their life. I discovered liberation in the craft of acting and making people laugh or cry or think was icing on the cake.

But where is the fun in suffering through a divorce, illness or bullying? The joy of true connection. This is what we must remember as artists:

It is our job to honor these people’s lives. Someone out there is in mourning, being abused, divorcing, battling addiction, being bullied or struggling with their own self-worth. Our work reaches out to those that think they’re different, weird, lost, or misunderstood and says, “I get you.”

You’ve had this experience yourself as an audience member. Remember being deeply moved by a story and characters that you closely related to? You probably felt less alone because of that play, show or movie. Maybe you even discovered other people who felt the same way.

This is why Jill Soloway created the award-winning Amazon Prime show, Transparent:

“My parent came out at the tender age of 74 as trans… when people are coming out, they’re coming out literally to save their lives. They’re coming out to make a break for authenticity… that’s one of the reasons I wanted to make the show… It kind of triggers people to understand… After my parent came out, I really wanted to do something that would make the world a safer place for my parent to walk out of her apartment building, hail a taxi or stand in an elevator with strangers. People who are trans have told me the show has made the world a little bit different for them.”

That is why we do it. To connect. To empathize. To tell someone else’s story truthfully and change the world. It is extremely gratifying to have a stranger say, “That is exactly how I feel. You captured my experience perfectly. Thank you.

Don’t get me wrong; it’s hard. It takes vulnerability and courage and risk. When we do our job well – honestly, without defense, freely – we connect with the character, the other actors and our audience. It may feel uncomfortable while you’re in it, but true connection is the gold at the end of that difficult journey.

Michael J. Fox says, “An actor’s palette is the entirety of the human experience.” Our job is to represent humanity; the wildly fucked-up, glorious mess that we are. So the next time you hit that block, remember to breathe, gather your courage, and know someone out there will feel less alone because of you.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9290691

From Stage To Screen: Toning It Down While Keeping It Real

Ah, the stage! The glorious live performance. When you’ve had years of experience on the stage, every cell in your body knows what performing feels like. Your body knows to be bigger, louder. It feels full, grand, real and you can hear the audience react. How rewarding. How deliciously rewarding!

Then you do film or TV for the first time and your eyebrows act like caterpillars on crack. You look like a bobblehead or cartoon character. You’re surprised your eyes don’t pop out of your head to the sound of an old fashioned horn. There’s no way around it; you’re simply horrible.

You’re told, “Be small! Be still! Tone it down! Don’t do anything!” So you stop: you stop moving or doing anything. You try to keep those caterpillars – and the rest of your body – contained.

And you certainly see a difference. It’s not nearly as big as it was before. But now instead of Roger Rabbit, you look like Robbie the Robot. You’re empty. Uncaring. Boring. Weird. Like you’re stuck in a cage, frozen.

You’re afraid to move, feel, express or be yourself.

So where is the happy medium between cartoon character and robot? And how do you get there?

For any actor that has ever been told to be small, still, contained, and not do anything, let’s free you from that cage. Here are your keys:

Key #1: You’ve been given horrible direction.

With all due respect to whomever told you to “be small, be still, don’t do anything,” those words are inaccurate and make you self-conscious about what you’re doing. What you should have been told is:

Allow your behavior to be the same as it is in your everyday life. You don’t need to perform anymore. You just need to be real.

Key #2: You don’t think about your behavior in your everyday life.

You just live. You wish your best friend didn’t move or hope your boss doesn’t make you stay late or wonder if the cute guy at the party will notice you. As you experience life, your thoughts and feelings result in organic and unconscious behavior. You just live and react without ever thinking about it.

Key #3: So that means stage acting is unnatural.

Stage performance, while a rush, is nowhere near our true reality. It requires so much more than our everyday behavior. You consciously put in effort to manufacture unnatural behavior – bigger and louder behavior – to reach the 500th row. (And I’m sure you do it brilliantly.)

Key #4: Guess what? TV and film acting reflects everyday life behavior. (aka: natural behavior)

When we’re truthfully experiencing our daily life, our minds, faces, bodies and voices are exquisitely alive with that life. We don’t try to advertise our thoughts and feelings, they are already seen.

And so it is with acting for the screen. If you’ve used your imagination to create your relationship to your best friend, boss and the cutie pie as full experiences, we will see it on your face, in your eyes and in your behavior.

You won’t have to think about being still or small or real; you just will be. No effort required.

Key #5: Why? Because the camera is inside your head.

The audience isn’t 500 rows away, they’re just a few feet away – right where another human being would be, if not much closer. In fact, the camera is so close, it’s practically reading your thoughts. That’s how much it – and the audience – can see.

And here’s the best part:

Key #6: When it comes to natural behavior, TV and film acting is easier than stage acting.

For the delicious theater experience, we must consciously adjust our behavior to show our love or anger. But for TV and film, if we simply truly feel love or anger, the audience will see it. Just like real life.

So you can drop the rabbit and the robot. Stop trying so hard to keep still inside that cage of non-behavior. That is not real, nor authentic. You are. When you invest in your relationships and circumstances, your voice and body follow. Your behavior follows. Unconsciously. Organically.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9290700

The Secret To Surviving The Quiet Season

dsc_1289-1024x680-810x538A successful producer once told me that the key to surviving this industry is how you handle the time in between gigs. “It’s easy when you’re working; it’s what you do when you’re not working that really counts.”

He wasn’t suggesting hiding under the bed with a pint of Cherry Garcia and a vision board and waiting for the phone to ring. He also didn’t mean you should focus solely on career-centric activities, networking your face off until you’re tongue falls out of your mouth. He meant, above all, you have to stay creative and enjoy a well-rounded life.

After all, wasn’t it your artistry that inspired a pursuit of this career in the first place? And what inspires all art? Life. Our creativity and ideas spring directly from the well of our life experiences. The more life we live, the deeper the well from which our creative souls drink like a bacchanal.

So how do we continue to fill the well? We live. Fully. Every single day. Here’s how you remain creative even when the industry/your career seems to be inhabited by crickets:

Stay curious. We human beings are so wildly complex and unique and interesting! Instead of just putting people in a box, stay curious. When you meet new people, chat with current friends, or even just hear a story about someone, don’t just scratch the surface of where they’re from and what they do. Ask questions that delve deeper into who they are and how they came to be the person they are today. Who, what, where, why, how?

Being curious leads to understanding. Understanding leads to connection – the single most important tool for a student of humanity (aka: artists). And all of that requires…

Shifting from Judgey McJudgester to Madame Empathy. It’s oh-so-easy to label a group of people you know nothing about as a bunch of douchebags. But maybe you’re the douchebag for being so judgey. Have some curiosity and empathy. Why do you think those individuals gravitate towards each other? What do those clothes allow them to express? What are they searching for and have they found it? What might you even have in common with them? (Hint: the search for a sense of belonging is universal.)

Explore! Trying new things expands your understanding of the world and yourself. Exploring can be as dramatic as jumping out of a plane or as intimate as eating sushi for the first time. Expand the types of stories you follow; read about people or communities you’ve never thought about before. Go to a new environment or city, even if it’s just next door. Watch TED Talks about subjects that interest you but which you know nothing about. And then watch ones about subjects you wouldn’t normally consider.

Discuss your exploration. I used to think that if I ended up in a relationship where we sat in front of the TV on most nights, then we were screwed. That would mean we hated each other and used the TV to ignore our crumbling union. But it’s quite the opposite. My man (also an actor) and I watch our favorite shows, movies and documentaries and then have passionate discussions about theme, characters, storytelling, acting, shots, what worked what didn’t – we learn from each other and from our attempts to communicate what we saw in that particular piece of art. So not only do we connect more deeply to each other, we connect more deeply to the types of human beings portrayed on the small screen.

But don’t stop with art (or your significant other). If you’ve stayed curious and explored humanity with empathy, you’ve probably made fascinating discoveries and will be eager to discuss them.

Remember: Curiosity, empathy, exploration and discussion in your daily life exercises your ability to connect to a character more readily, no matter how far from you they may seem.

Find other creative outlets. The Artist’s Way helped me find my voice as a writer, which was very helpful when I was between gigs as an actor. Writing didn’t require another person, so I could enjoy that creative expression, even when I didn’t have a gig or the cash for a class. Writing feeds me still, all these years later. I also sing (get coaching and jam with friends). And now, since acting, coaching, writing and singing all involve words, I’ve found new excitement and release in the adult coloring book craze! Talk about rediscovering your inner child!

So what’s that hobby you always wanted to try or had as a kid and dropped later? You don’t even have to be good at it. From sports to gardening to hip hop class, anything that lets you play feeds your creative soul.

Create your own acting opportunities. Challenge yourself to 30-days of auditions, whether you get called for one or create one with your friends. Pull sides from online and work on them as if you have a real audition. Or have a script reading at your home of an old classic or a new one. Let your friends know you’re available as a reader for script development. (Writers and directors always need to hear a script out loud at least a couple of times as they massage it.) Join a theater company. If you’re a writer also, then heck, now’s the time to write that project for yourself. Even the shortest of videos – vines, even – keep you creative!

Lead a well rounded life.” I’m stealing this from a Casting Director; those were her very words. Life can’t just be about your art and career. You must allow yourself to have relationships, take vacations, spend time with family, relax, make cookies, try new food, socialize, work out, travel, read, take a walk, dance, celebrate, laugh. All that down time is important for your emotional and spiritual renewal – and your creative inner life as well.

When you live your life fully, you fill the well of creativity and add more connection and complexity to your craft. So let your well runneth over and drink up!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9290697

Enjoying Movies Through The Best Service

The Internet has had a huge impact on the way audiences are able to watch their favorite films. Services that allow users to stream content to their computer or mobile device make it easier to find just the right film or show. Services that are available to use free of charge can provide you with the entertainment option you have been seeking without requiring you to pay to watch the latest movies and your favorite television shows.

Internet based services can differ considerably in terms of what they can provide for their audiences. Options that require users to open an account and provide personal details and information may not be the best resource. Choosing a service that allows you to begin watching content more quickly and easily could prove far more convenient.

Paying for movies and maintaining accounts that require monthly subscription costs is often more expensive than many users might realize. While such fees and costs are typically low, they can quickly add up. Services that can be utilized without having to pay offer a budget friendly alternative for those who love films and television shows.

Not every service or content provider is able to offer audiences the selection they may be looking for. Whether you are attempting to find specific movies or prefer to make use of services that have more variety, content and options to offer, choosing the right site can make a difference. Service options that may only have a limited number of titles to stream may find you unable to enjoy the types of movies you most want to watch.

Mobile devices provide the perfect way to enjoy movies in a wide variety of environments and situations. From curing up on the couch to staying entertained on long trips, being able to stream movies right to your tablet or phone may be easier than you might have imagined. Dealing with the right content provider or service makes it far easier to watch your favorite movies on a variety of devices.

Dealing with content providers that fail to provide a wider selection of titles can become very aggravating. Accounts that involve costs and fees may end up placing strain on your budget and financial resources. Only the best online movie streaming services can provide you with a quick and easy way to enjoy a wide range of titles from your computer or mobile device without having to pay any costs at all.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9314981

What Is The Consideration Before Buying A Portable Projector

To buy and set up a projector for a home theatre system or presentation could be somewhat challenging. Here are some pointers that can act as a good guide to look into.

Ambient Light

Light from the surrounding can wash out the image of the projection. The brightness of a projector is measured in lumens, so do check the lumens before a purchase. Brighter ambient lights would mean requiring higher brightness, which translates to, more lumens needed.

Powered by battery

Projectors generally consume a lot of energy; however with the advancement in technology, portable projectors are becoming more efficient. In some cases, it can be powered by a small battery for roughly 1-2 hours. Of course there might be a trade-off not forgetting the factor mentioned in this article.

Mounting your projector

Most projectors can be displayed upside-down or right side up, allowing for flexibility when deciding the mounting position. Another important thing to take note of is to ensure that the projection is not easily obstructed.

Affordability

In the past, there aren’t many choices, getting a basic projector requires average expense of about a $1,000, or more for the bigger brands. Nowadays, it is getting cheaper, with larger varieties of model and brands, ranging from as cheap as US $40.00 it can be easily purchased online. Projectors have certainly become much more accessible and affordable for casual usage.

Projector screen

Although a projector screen is optional, you will still need to consider the surface the projection is being projected on. You may consider using a section of your wall for that purpose. This is a good alternative as you have no worries about fabric getting ripped or frayed. But of course, that doesn’t deter you from getting a projector screen such as screens made up of matte vinyl fabric or pull-down screens etc.

Lamp replacement

Maintenance cost from replacement of projector bulbs is one of the major considerations. As it requires high power to project images, these bulbs generally do not last long. One thing to look out for before buying a projector is the life expectancy of the bulb/lamp. Generally it can last for 2000 hours.

So, now you have a rough guide on what you need to consider before buying a portable projector. Do keep in mind of this when investing in a projector; it could be an object of envy amongst your social circle.

Presentation to a small group sometime can be a hassle. Portable, mini & low price projector can be helpful. It is suitable for business presentations, high definition home theater, small meetings, training & multimedia. This is the right place for you.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9343386

The Office Business Transitions

Introduction

As a business, it is strategically important to define a direction of where the company is going. The Office started off as just Dunder Mifflin a paper company. They had very profitable sales periods, and also very low sales periods. After a huge decline in business, the company Sabre lead by CEO Joe Bennett came and bought out Dunder Mifflin and diversifying the given products that they sell. Was one business acquisition better than the other? This article will identify ways that the series showed how a firm can go into a different market when it is near failing.

Dunder Mifflin

Was specifically a paper company. Sales representatives made different clients every day and they sold them solely paper products. CEO David Wallace had the company up and running quite smoothly through the first few episodes. After a while had passed, management buckled and the company was headed towards bankruptcy. All assets of the company would be sold and all the branches was said to be closing. However, a different direction was introduced keeping the company and show alive.

Sabre

Sabre lead by CEO Joe Bennett bought out Dunder Mifflin when they were going bankrupt. This put an emphasis on new products such as printers. A lot of employees did not like that new changes that Sabre was making but learned to adapt. They even stepped into the electronics division by introducing a new product similar to a tablet called “The Pyramid.”

Management Styles

1. Michael Scott: The playful boss that believes in a work environment that productivity comes from “distractions.” Michael attempts to make a fun social work environment that occur with activities that are usually off topic and involve sexual humor. One in particular being the phrase “that’s what she said.”

2. Robert California: Has a management style closely based on the philosophy of Sigmund Freud. Everything from incentives and daily operations gets referred back to the subject of sex and the human body. Robert California was referred to a genius and later on became the CEO of Dunder Milfflin.

3. Dwight Schrute: Dwight was a temporary acting manager and finally became branch manager by the end of the series. He had a very authoritarian approach and many rules and regulation that seemed unfair to many employees. One episode Dwight made employees use a code name in order to enter the building. If the employee forgot the code name, they were not granted access and also sprayed by a steam compressor machine.

Conclusion

This business acquisition ended up saving the company and many jobs. We can learn that there are other opportunities when firms are up against touch decisions.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9387449